Country music

Country icon Wynonna Judd gets real about the joys of going solo and finding happiness by “living on love”

Country music icon and female powerhouse Wynonna Judd may have started to become a celebrity early on, but the real joy lived in finding herself along the way, she revealed on “The Pursuit! With John” Rich ”from FOX Business.

The young star first took the stage in front of 10,000 people at the age of 18 alongside her mother Naomi Judd. Together, they hit the road, performing sold-out events as The Judds throughout the 1980s. The duo released six studio albums and won multiple Country Music and Grammy Awards.

But in 1992, after her manager convinced her to give up the duo and focus on a solo career, Wynonna first performed at the American Music Awards as Wynonna. Singer and host John Rich remembered the breakup as country music’s biggest farewell.

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“I’m too good a performer, I’m a perfectionist and I really want to be successful in the light,” she said. “And it worked because it was the biggest campaign… It was the biggest goodbye, the biggest, in country music at the time to say hello, she comes on her own.”

Like other great women like Shania and Martina, Wynonna rose through the ranks. But the star explained that the Curb Records marketing team decided to ditch Judd so that Wynonna’s records would be alone and away from The Judds on record store shelves.

Wynonna’s solo moment, after sharing a tour bus with her mom for 10 years, launched her on a nonstop road career, leading her to big breakups like her performance at the halftime show. of the Super Bowl in 1994.

“I worked harder than anyone I think,” she said. “I remember being home two weeks at a time like a year… I didn’t have kids. I didn’t have a man. I was a road bitch working on a mission.”

The singer recalled times with her heroes and “deer” like Loretta Lynn, Aretha Franklin and James Taylor who supported her “authentic” approach to music.

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Now in the modern age of technology and social media, Wynonna hasn’t denied that it’s difficult for artists today not to get carried away by the noise. During the coronavirus pandemic, she admitted that the mandatory cessation of manic living was a great blessing.

“I tried to find a way to never, ever, ever be so distracted as I was before I came home on March 14 of last year,” she said.

After 39 years on the fast lane to stardom, Wynonna exposed her recent “unraveling” of all of her past experiences that brought her to the epiphany of what it really means to live.

“All my life I have lived for love,” she said. “And here I am at 57 and I’m trying to figure out how to make a living from love.”

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“I’m learning to let go of the wait to ask myself if I made you happy or not and if you like me,” she continued. “I had to prove myself personally. I knew professionally that I could sing and that I could manage. That’s what I did. I was trained to be a champion.”

For Americans who have a constitutional right to pursue happiness, Wynonna shared her best advice for “following your happiness.”

“I was happy rich and happy poor; size 18, size 8,” she said. “I can tell you what it is on both sides. But I’ll tell you, what’s interesting now that I haven’t had is the peace that is beyond comprehension.”

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