Music industry

Australian music industry under review for “sexual harm, sexual harassment and systemic discrimination”

Australia’s music industry is under a six-month review by two consultants examining the incidences of “sexual harm, sexual harassment and systemic discrimination”.

the National Journal of the Music Industry is headed by two consultants, Alexandra Shehadie and Sam Turner, who will begin the first stages of the investigation this month and plan to complete their work in June 2022.

Recommendations will then be made to Australian industry companies designed to ‘ensure [the] the music industry has a safe, respectful and inclusive culture ”.

The consultants say they will get information from a range of people from record companies, publishers, artists, artist directors, agents, festival and production staff, and others.

They add that the review “will not investigate any individual incident but will constitute a broad cultural review. [and] will be an opportunity for people to share their stories, have their voices heard and come up with ideas on how the industry can be a safer, more inclusive and more respectful workplace ”.

The final report will not name the individuals or the alleged perpetrators.

“The aim is to hear the stories and experiences of music professionals from all corners of the contemporary music industry to inform a deep understanding of the issues at play and recommend areas for reform,” a document said. FAQ. “The report will share de-identified stories, with permission from the person involved.”

the national Music industry review will include: (i) A national survey; (ii) A confidential online written submission process; (iii) focus groups in a range of fields and demographics; (iv) Confidential individual interviews.

“Warner Music welcomes this opportunity to engage with the entire industry to share what we’ve done, learn from others, and continue to grow to create an environment in which we all feel safe, heard and heard. respected. “

Dan Rosen, Warner Music Australia

His arrival was greeted by Dan Rosen, President of Warner Music Australasia, who said: “There has never been a more important time to recognize that the responsibility lies with each of us to grow and be. positive participants in the change our industry needs. .

“Warner Music welcomes this opportunity to engage with the entire industry to share what we’ve done, learn from others, and continue to grow to create an environment in which we all feel safe, heard and heard. respected. “

Hannah Pehi, Head of People and Culture at Warner Music Australasia, added: “An important step in resetting our industry as a whole is to understand all of the factors that got us to where we are today. We welcome the opportunity to support change and will do all we can to help shape a better future for the Australian music industry.

“Universal Music Australia is committed to making this lasting change and fully supports this initiative as part of this effort.”

George Ash, Universal Music Australia

George Ash, President of Universal Music Asia Pacific, said of the magazine: “Everyone deserves a respectful, safe, inclusive and fair work environment. This independent and transparent national review is an important step towards achieving this goal, not only in the field of music, but also as an example of progress throughout society.

“Universal Music Australia is committed to making this lasting change and fully supports this initiative as part of this effort.”

In January, Warner Music fired Scott Maclachlan, senior A&R executive, following an internal investigation into allegations of sexual harassment.

Another senior Oz company executive, Tony Glover, was fired by Sony Music in April following an independent investigation into allegations of sexual harassment and bullying. Glover initially denied the allegations.

In June, Sony Music Australia parted ways with its longtime CEO and chairman Denis Handlin, who was accused by several employees of fostering a toxic work culture and workplace harassment. Handlin has not been charged with any sexual harassment or assault.

In July, Universal Music Australia President George Ash informed his company that UMG was launching its own independent workplace culture investigation following anonymous allegations of wrongdoing within the company.

“As the leader of this company, I take full responsibility for creating a respectful work culture for everyone,” Ash wrote in an email to staff.

“As far as my own behavior is concerned, it is particularly painful to realize now that what I heard as jokes were unacceptable comments that made some of you uncomfortable.”

And earlier this month, Mushroom Group announced it was parting ways with the Harbor Agency business, after an investigation was launched into the latter company linked to claims by former Port Agency employees over the past management behavior and workplace culture.

the Music industry review is supported by two Australian collecting societies – APRA AMCOS and PPCA – as well as the recording industry trade group ARIA and the music industry charity Support Act.Music trade around the world